2013
07.11

Gyula Shakespeare Festival’s Hamlet

Mátray László as Hamlet. Photo by Kiss Zoltan.

Mátray László as Hamlet. Photo by Kiss Zoltan.

The Tamási Áron Theatre’s superb Hungarian-language Hamlet, which opened on July 5 at co-producer Gyula Castle Theatre, revealed the great potential of tourist-festival Shakespeare.

The Castle Theatre—or Vászinház—has hosted performances annually since 1964, and though it has a longish history of staging Shakespeare intermittently, current festival director József Gedeon only formally began the Shakespeare Festival as a part of the company’s season nine years ago, in 2005. While the current season features three Hungarian-language Hamlets and one Hungarian-language Taming of the Shrew, Gedeon extends the Festival’s tradition of bringing to Gyula international Shakespeare, including a Measure for Measure by the Vakhtangov Theatre of Moscow (which played at the Globe-to-Globe Festival in 2012), Steven Berkoff’s one-man Shakespeare’s Villains, and the Polish-English Song of the Goat Theatre’s Songs of Lear (which won awards at last year’s Edinburgh Festival). Read more…

2013
04.05

A Steady Rain

A Steady RainThe Wednesday-night preview/dress rehearsal of Keith Huff’s A Steady Rain gave audiences in the Barbara Barrett Theatre a very clear idea of why this two-hander has become so popular. The play’s narrative (and Huff scripts plenty of actual narrative) is sufficiently melodramatic to hold most spectators’ imaginations: “Bad cop” Denny’s life veers towards the ditch when his sideline as a petty extortionist catches up with him;  “Good cop” Joey, a recovering alcoholic and Denny’s best friend, tries but fails to save Denny from himself. The play’s heady mixture of adultery, prostitution, drive-by shootings, injured and dead children, back-alley beat-downs, cannibalism, and the crossing of Denny and Joey’s trajectories as one sinks into despair and the other rises to salvation, is calculated to keep theatregoers riveted. Read more…

2012
07.14

New World Theatre Season Three

NWTP Smaller PicThe New World Theatre Project (NWTP) opened its third season with William Shakespeare’s The Tempest on July 7th. The production is evidence of how the company is settling in at the site in Cupids and becoming a very meaningful summer tradition. The building is weathering to a light grey (unlike the blond boarding in the accompanying picture below) and NWTP is about to mix in some non-Shakespearean classical theatre: Andy Jones’ adaptation of Molière’s Tartuffe, will open in early August (in the past, the company has produced contemporary non-Shakespearean fare). Read more…

2012
07.14

A Polish Macbeth at the Globe

Makbet

Read a review of Makbet (in Polish) that was part of the  theatre’s 2012 Globe-to-Globe season.

Watch video of Globe-to-Globe productions at the Art Council’s site.

2012
02.17

Rig: A Play

Rig Image

Rig: A Play commemorates the thirtieth anniversary of the Ocean Ranger disaster when, on February 15, 1982, the oil rig sank in the North Atlantic off the east coast of Newfoundland and Labrador, claiming the lives of all eighty-four men who were aboard the structure.

Playwright Joan Sullivan has produced a one-hour script by adapting Mike Heffernan’s excellent two hundred-page book Rig: An Oral History of the Ocean Ranger Disaster, based on interviews with family members of rig workers, workers who were not aboard the Ocean Ranger the night it went down, and those connected with the rescue efforts and the aftermath of the tragic events thirty years ago (Heffernan’s father’s cousin was one of the workers). Read more…